Tue,May 28 ,2024


With the start of the Arab revolutions, where some success and jumped over the obstacle of chaos, initiating the process of peaceful transfer of power, and initiating steps of democracy, peace, and development, we find that others have fallen to the bottom in the conflict. Peoples who failed to move from the stage of revolution to the stage of stability went through a difficult stage on the human level, increasing the rates of internal displacement in countries that live in war within their borders between the warring political parties. The proportions of refugees from these countries to the world have also increased, and those who remain in their places live in unstable and dangerous conditions. They lack the necessary services that people need, the unstable conditions of these people and governments contributed in this, too, especially with obstacles related to conflicts such as restrictions on imports, collapse of basic services and institutions, severe economic decline, loss of livelihoods, difficulty in accessing markets, currency depreciation, rising food and commodity prices and increased instability. These conditions required many interventions from local and international NGOs, United Nations agencies, and development agencies in the world to cover basic human needs in these affected countries. It has been active in programs related to humanitarian response such as food security, agriculture, and health-related issues, including outbreaks of epidemics and communicable diseases, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services, and a significant rise in malnutrition, especially among children. In addition to the IDPs  and refugees needs for shelter services in the camps/sites and their needs for basic food and non-food items. On the other hand, vulnerable groups needed protection services, especially children, the low level of educational services, and the low endurance and flexibility of local communities in the affected countries, which raised the costs of the humanitarian operation in all conflict-affected countries. Conflicts have contributed to high rates of gender-based violence, the ability of local communities to combat it, and the lack of community participation in these communities to address their current social issues and their need for support, capacity building, and local empowerment to enable them to withstand. Dependence has increased on INGOs and United Nations agencies, which have worked on developing rapid response mechanisms to humanitarian needs, strengthening supply mechanisms, and raising their capabilities in the humanitarian coordination and emergency communication services. Intervention of these NGOs, they needed to develop their practices, goals, and their ability to monitor humanitarian indicators, and achieve the humanitarian goals because of which they intervened in these conflict-ridden countries. Given these interventions, an increase in the humanitarian funding, expansion of the interventions of these organizations throughout the affected cities happen, which resulted a need  for large numbers of humanitarians workers, NGOs discovers the lack of skilled and good humanitarian expertise.  As the experience of conflict in the Arab countries is considered recent. Despite the early formation of civil society in some of them, such as Yemen, working on issues that were associated with a growing and semi-democratic environment, it did not have actual experiences in humanitarian response, and the activists in these institutions did not have practical experience in humanitarian work, and its complex details. Thus, at the beginning of the intervention, international organizations (INGOs) and agencies suffered from the ability to obtain humanitarian staff capable of implementing a successful humanitarian program. Humanitarian work has developed a lot after years of fieldwork, practical experiences have been gained by local humanitarian staff through which they can implement such programs well. With the continuation of the conflict, it seemed that the humanitarian workers formed field experiences; however, the theoretical gap regarding humanitarian standards, professional work systems, and the details of the needs of the different humanitarian groups still existed strongly. For good and positively influential humanitarian work in affected communities, it has become necessary for humanitarian workers to have packages of personal and practical skills to work professionally in the administrative, organizational, practical, and field humanitarian work according to the professional mechanisms that have been developed over decades of humanitarian work in the world.  It has become important for humanitarian workers to have practical experiences in various fields to be able to perform humanitarian work with quality, to be able to deal with beneficiaries, to obtain feedback from them on the quality of humanitarian work, ways to develop it, and to participate in decision-making about their needs. For reasons related to the conflict, and the inability to build capacities for humanitarian workers directly, it became necessary to develop their expertise and skills in managing humanitarian work remotely via the Internet, and this necessitated the existence of many training platforms that provide capacity building in the details of humanitarian work, translating into Arabic hundreds of specialized courses, and motivating those humanitarian workers to benefit from them. There are basics that every humanitarian worker must be familiar with and obtain capacity-building in, including familiarization with the humanitarian context, regulations and standards associated with it, capacity-building, and experience in humanitarian principles, international humanitarian law,  international human rights laws, which include: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Universal Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the Universal Covenant on Cultural, Economic and Social Rights, and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.  In addition to the Geneva Conventions specialized in protecting people in war, and building the expertise of the humanitarian worker in basic humanitarian practices, not ending with humanitarian leadership as an advanced model of expertise to work with people affected by conflict. Apart from the basics, there are details in humanitarian work that require the worker to have a minimum knowledge of global labor mechanisms, practices and policies, especially in the field of humanitarian specialization such as food security, health, protection, childhood..etc.  Thus, some of the basic skills related to each humanitarian category or humanitarian work must be obtained by every worker in the INGOs/NNGOs and UN agencies. The worker in the field of childhood in conflicts, and the specialist of child humanitarian work, is supposed to be familiar with children’s issues, conflicts and methods of work, and what kind of projects can be offered to these affected children. Therefore, a  humanitarian worker must have a deep knowledge of the Convention on the Rights of the Child as a basic structure for working with them, build his/her expertise in the field of working with children in humanitarian work, working with children during conflicts, protection of children in emergencies, how to achieve positive results for this category, and ways of planning and programming to protect them, and the best ways to achieve positive outcomes in the development of children and adolescents during conflict.  It is important to make the humanitarian process positively impactful for the children, and to build capacities for workers in basic programs targeting children in emergencies, such as mental and psychological health, support and social care, and protecting children from violence, abuse, neglect, economic and sexual exploitation, child recruitment, early marriage, and ways to protect children in the humanitarian response. Humanity, procedures and principles of child protection, and minimum standards for their protection.  Enhancing their participation in humanitarian work as one of the basic criteria of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, identifying their needs during conflict, coordinating projects for this purpose, building the capacities of supervisors working with them, and constructing strategies for their protection. Considering the quality of the capabilities of those working with children during the conflict, such as managing cases of child abuse, referral of cases that need support and treatment, managing child-friendly centers, and community centers that provide services to them. Attention must be paid to building the capacities of those working with children and taking care of them according to their age and the need of each age for different methods of protection i.e. early childhood, adolescents and youth, and according to their social conditions such as child soldiers, children on the street, workers, children living with HIV, children with disabilities, children  who dropout  school. , and those who suffer from smuggling in countries suffering conflict, and those who live in fragile situations that threaten them and their lives and their physical, mental and psychological health, and children who lack family care..etc.  Women suffer greatly from the conflict in terms of widespread gender-based violence (GBV), sexual violence, displacement, asylum, the inability to obtain resources through which they can withstand the conflict, and their low ability to obtain humanitarian assistance. Thus, the humanitarian factor assumes the ability to deal with women's issues in conflict, such as the positive impact on women's health in conflict, the ability to define and combat GBV, sexual violence, manage this type of violence, and work to promote gender equality in access to assistance, promote diversity and inclusion in this aspect, and enhance communication and coordination in the protection of women during conflict and the humanitarian response to it. Identifying the different needs and equal opportunities for both sexes in humanitarian work, identifying and helping women with AIDS, and developing justice in gender and people with disabilities, the humanitarian worker is supposed to work on building his/her capacities in the field of being able to identify their disability and need, and the degree of help theming  them in the light of the rest types of humanitarian response such as people with disabilities, food security, health, access to water and sanitation, education and shelter, and the degree of sensitivity of all these types to them and their ability to obtain them.  There are also the elderly, the IDPs, refugees, and people from religious, racial and ethnic minorities, and these groups require building the capacities of workers in the field of tracking them and identifying their needs, and the best ways to help them. Remembering these humanitarian groups and their needs, made it important to have capacity-building for humanitarian response workers in the areas of humanitarian work itself, and the methods of managing them in the correct internationally recognized manner.  In this aspect, skills such as designing and managing projects during conflict, conflict-sensitive tools, the rules of non-harm, the ABCs of influencing work for health and hygiene in emergencies, distributing relief materials, implementing education projects in emergencies, child protection mechanisms, and optimal methods to identify needs, tools for communication, information exchange, monitoring, evaluation, accountability and learning (MEAL) in humanitarian response settings, Methods of dealing with persons with disabilities and the elderly, methods and mechanisms of security and protection, designing security plans for organizations and their employees, analyzing risks and their context and dealing with them in humanitarian work, know the ways to build a better response to humanitarian work.  Add to that the skills related to dealing with war-affected groups like: the administrative and personal skills related to work in general and that are useful in humanitarian work such as project management practices, financing management, relationship development skills for managers, team leadership, selection, collection, analysis and cleaning of data, and conversion it into useful and easy fictitious data.  Developing theories of social change, advocacy mechanisms for humanitarian issues, humanitarian journalism, best ways to manage and analyze conflict, whether of religious or political origin, time management, management  of priorities and self-management, writing techniques, report writing skills, and professional communication styles. This includes some of the skills needed by the humanitarian activities, for example in the field of food security, humanitarian work needs skills, including know the concept of food security, methods of implementing projects, reducing risks related to food insecurity in societies, and ways to make food security have a positive impact.  Methods of networking, information exchange and organization, good programming, methods of monitoring and evaluation of food security and its activities, as well as qualitative and numerical quality in food security programs and the best methods for writing reports on this aspect, and at a higher level, humanitarian workers are supposed to have good knowledge of international standards. which regulates work in the humanitarian field like Sphere standards. Minimum Standards for the protection of Children in Emergencies, Minimum Standards for Working with Older Persons and Persons with Disabilities in Emergencies, Basic Humanitarian Principles, Basic Principles for Market Analysis in Emergencies, Standards for the Protection of Women from Gender-Based Violence in Conflict, International Humanitarian Law and Related Geneva Conventions Relevance. The following pages focus on providers of remote training services and their types, and whether they are open, dedicated to members, or semi-open to members of the organization and guests. What are the available training, which of them serve the humanitarian workers, and is it free or not, and what is its geographical extent local, regional or global, and are there universities that have humanitarian training, what are the sites that offer humanitarian training on the Internet in a commercial way, learning the role of unrelated training in humanitarian action in the field of humanitarian action itself. What are the most important websites that do not provide training services, but are considered important in referring those who want to learn to the most important international training sites? On the other hand, are there phone applications that give capacity building to the humanitarian worker, their importance, where they are located, and how they can be used? The same thing about electronic games and the extent to which some of them provide training in humanitarian work through simulation and the importance of this in building the capacities of the humanitarian worker in countries experiencing conflict. The following part talks about types of training sites that provide capacity building for humanitarian workers via the Internet.

The book contains 238 pages, and you can download the book, which contains thousands of titles for most of these training platforms, by clicking on the image of the book in the link.

Tue,May 28 ,2024